NAKU, M: ATEA: Nature and Divinity in Polynesia (Winter 2019 Bulletin)

Nuku, Maia. ATEA: Nature and Divinity in Polynesia (Winter 2019 Bulletin). Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2019. Unmarked. Very Good. Paperback (Saddle Stitched). (#30936) $12.00

Buy it Now

Beautifully illustrated. 48p. Accompanied exhibition. The exhibition looked at on an array of artistic creations that illuminate how Polynesians traditionally understood their relationship with the divine as active, dynamic, and manifested in the plants, feathers, and fibers of the islands they inhabited. Featuring some thirty exceptional works from the late 18th to the 19th century

Atea is a Polynesian cosmological term that refers to the moment when it was believed that light first sparked forth after many eons of thick, engulfing darkness, resulting in the birth of the first generation of gods. .

BUTTERFIELD, D: Deborah Butterfield: Sculpture

Image. Deborah Butterfield: Sculpture Deborah Butterfield: Sculpture. Hansen Fuller Goldeen Gallery, 1981. Unmarked. Very Good. Booklet (Saddle Stitched). (#30909) $20.00

Buy it Now

Seven plates showcase Butterfield’s early work. Also a photo of the artist with a both live horses and a sculptured horse.

Organized by Hansen Fuller Goldeen Gallery, San Francisco, this exhibition traveled to 5 west coast and Intermountain Museums from 1981-1983. 24p.

Poem by William Wiley. Artist statement.

Butterfield (b. 1949) is known for her sculptures of horses made from found objects, like metal, and especially pieces of wood.

TODD, M: Michael Todd: Painted and Patinated Bronze and Steel

Tuchman, Phyllis. Michael Todd: Painted and Patinated Bronze and Steel. Klein Gallery, 1985. Unmarked. Very Good. Paperback (Saddle Stitched). (#30874) $15.00

Buy it Now

Exhibition catalog. Introduction by Phyllis Tuchman. Photographs of the artist. 8 color plates. Biography. 24p.

Michael Todd (b. 1935) is an American sculptor. Inspired by Zen concepts and calligraphy and the freedom of expression in California of the late 60’s, Todd used discarded shapes found in steel scrap yards to explore the cosmos and composition in space.