ERNST, M: Une Semaine De Bonte: A Surrealistic Novel in Collage by Max Ernst

Ernst, Max. Une Semaine De Bonte: A Surrealistic Novel in Collage by Max Ernst. Dover, 1976. ISBN: 9780486232522. Unmarked. Very Good. Paperback. (#26762) $10.00

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Une Semaine de Bonte (A Week of Kindness) is divided into seven parts, one for each day of the week. This is an unabridged republication of the legendary masterpiece, which first appeared in 1934. 208p.

Max Ernst was a German painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet. A prolific artist, Ernst was one of the pioneers of the Dada movement and Surrealist movements.

WEHR, G: C.G. Jung in Selbstzeugnissen und Bilddokumenten (Rowohlts Monographien)

Wehr, Gerhard. C.G. Jung in Selbstzeugnissen und Bilddokumenten (Rowohlts Monographien). Rowohlt, 1983. ISBN: 349950152X. Unmarked. Text in German. Extensively illustrated. Index. Bibliography. 154p. Very Good. Paperback. (#26573) $12.00

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JUNG INSTITUTE: Jung Journal Culture and Psyche (Summer 2010, Vol 4, No. 3)

Sherwood, Dyane (editor). Jung Journal Culture and Psyche (Summer 2010, Vol 4, No. 3). C.G. Jung Institute, 2010. Unmarked. Bumped corner. Good. Paperback. (#26409) $14.00

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Issue theme: Psyche and same sex marriage. 132p. B/W illustrations.

Authors include Susan Rowland, Craig E. Stephenson, Joseph B. Wheelwright, John Beebe, John P. Dourley, Scott Wirth, Steven B. Herrmann, Jon Lucca, Michael Bala, and others.

The Official Journal of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco.

MIRO, J: Miro 1917-1934; L’exposition, The Exhibition

Miro 1917-1934; L'exposition, The Exhibition, book coverMiro 1917-1934; L’exposition, The Exhibition. Centre Pompidou, 2007. ISBN: 2844262287. Unmarked. Very Good. Paperback. (#26200) $14.00

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Accompanied exhibition at Centre Pompidou 3 March-28 June 2004.

Text in English and French. Color plates. Bibliographic landmarks. Measures 10.5 inches square.Miro 1917-1934; L'exposition, The Exhibition, back cover

JOLLES, A: The Curatorial Avant-Garde: Surrealism and Exhibition Practice in France, 1925-1941

The Curatorial Avant-Garde: Surrealism and Exhibition Practice in France, 1925-1941, book coverJolles, Adam. The Curatorial Avant-Garde: Surrealism and Exhibition Practice in France, 1925-1941 (Refiguring Modernism). Penn State University Press, 2013. ISBN: 9780271059396. Factory sealed. 288p. Measures 9×9.5 inches. Like New. Paperback. (#25877) $99.00

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Demonstrates the surrealists’ radical transformation of the ways in which spectators encountered works of art between the wars. From their introduction in Paris in 1925, surrealist exhibitions dissolved the conventional boundaries between visual media, language, and the space of public display. 25 color and 68 B/W illustrations.

The Curatorial Avant-Garde: Surrealism and Exhibition Practice in France, 1925-1941, back cover

PALERMO, C: Fixed Ecstasy: Joan Miró in the 1920s

Fixed Ecstasy: Joan Miró in the 1920s, book coverPalermo, Charles. Fixed Ecstasy: Joan Miró in the 1920s. Penn State University Press, 2007. ISBN: 9780271029726. Factory sealed. 282p. Like New. Paperback. (#25867) $36.00

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Measures 9×9.5 inches. 26 color/37 B/W illustrations. Examines Joan Miró’s (1893–1983) enterprise in the 1920s and the most important works of his career.

DIDI-HUMBERMAN, G: Confronting Images: Questioning the Ends of a Certain History of Art

Confronting Images: Questioning the Ends of a Certain History of Art, book coverDidi-Huberman, Georges. Confronting Images: Questioning the Ends of a Certain History of Art. Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004. ISBN: 9780271024721. Factory sealed. 336p. Measures 5.5×8.5 inches. 18 illustrations. New. Paperback. (#25865) $28.00

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According to Didi-Huberman, visual representation has an “underside” in which seemingly intelligible forms lose their clarity and defy rational understanding.

Art historians, he goes on to contend, have failed to engage this underside, where images harbor limits and contradictions, because their discipline is based upon the assumption that visual representation is made up of legible signs and lends itself to rational scholarly cognition epitomized in the “science of iconology.”

Didi-Huberman suggests that art historians look to Freud’s concept of the “dreamwork,” not for a code of interpretation, but rather to begin to think of representation as a mobile process that often involves substitution and contradiction.